Michigan gets closer

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4 years 10 months ago #53 by WWH Admin
WWH Admin created the topic: Michigan gets closer
Dick Martin Outdoor Column
Most readers know wolves are most populous in Minnesota, Wyoming, Yellowstone Park, and elsewhere. But they’re also living and thriving in our next-door neighbor, Michigan.

In fact, there are so many wolves there the Michigan commission now has permission to establish hunting seasons for the gray wolf.

There are about 700 wolves in Michigan and that number has grown since the federal government outlawed killing wolves four decades ago to keep them from going extinct in the lower 48 states. The law signed last month authorizes the creation of a wolf hunting season and sets license fees.

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4 years 10 months ago #55 by WWH Admin
WWH Admin replied the topic: Michigan gets closer
The following is a letter to the editor that was sent to the Kalamazoo Gazette.

TIMOTHY RYAN/Vicksburg

In regards to the letter by Cynthia McDade (March 3) concerning the hunting of wolves in Michigan, I think some facts are in order. In 1989, three wolves were estimated to be in the state while in 2012 the number was nearly 700.

The original U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plan called for 100 wolves in Michigan and Wisconsin for de-listing as endangered and 200 animals in each state to have a viable population. Currently, there are about 700 wolves in Michigan, 800 in Wisconsin and more than 3,000 in Minnesota; all populations far above that needed to have a viable population. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has identified approximately 16,000 square miles of land on the Upper Peninsula that is suitable for wolves, (each pack consists of five to six animals and requires between 20-130 square miles for their range).

Wolves in the upper Midwest are not endangered and a limited hunting season will be necessary to avoid having the population go above the maximum the land can support. There is no plan to "send the wolf back to the brink of extinction" as McDade implies.

For better or worse, we must step in and control the population of wild game in the state to avoid the damage to the environment that the over-population of any one species can cause.The DNR is proposing a very limited wolf season to avoid this problem before it gets out of hand.

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